Stephen C. Meyer Philosopher of Science
Topic

defining science

Close-up shot of microscope
Close-up shot of microscope with metal lens at laboratory.

Yes, Intelligent Design Is Detectable by Science

Biologists have long recognized that many organized structures in living organisms — the elegant form and protective covering of the coiled nautilus; the interdependent parts of the vertebrate eye; the interlocking bones, muscles, and feathers of a bird wing — “give the appearance of having been designed for a purpose.” Read More ›
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Dr. Meyer Gives Inaugural Annual Lecture for C4ID in London

In November 2011, Dr. Meyer addressed a distinguished group of leading British political, cultural, and intellectual leaders at the Royal Horseguards Hotel, No. 1 Whitehall, London, England. In attendance were several members of the House of Lords, university vice chancellors, and many journalists, politicians, philosophers and scientists. He was giving the inaugural annual lecture of the Centre for Intelligent Design (UK). The event was hosted by former Lord Chancellor Lord McKay of Clashfern. The complete video of Dr. Meyer’s talk, including an important Q&A discussion on what constitutes science, is now available on YouTube. Also available: coverage of the event here and here on Evolution News & Views and at the website for the Centre for Intelligent Design UK.
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Debate With Peter Ward at Talk of the Times (TVW)

The rematch, a debate with Meyer and Ward addressing each other’s arguments for intelligent design and evolution (or not, respectively).  Reporters and columnists especially should listen to this, as a real debate by scientists on the science of Darwinian evolution is almost as rare as life in the universe. Video from TVW
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cross spider on a web with dew drops
Photo by BlueManXL on Adobe Stock

The Scientific Status of Intelligent Design

Underlying Darwin's repudiation of creationist legitimacy lay an entirely different conception of science than had prevailed among earlier naturalists. Darwin's attacks on his creationist and idealist opponents in part expressed and in part established an emerging positivistic "episteme" in which the mere mention of unverifiable "acts of Divine will" or "the plan of creation" would increasingly serve to disqualify theories from consideration as science qua science. Read More ›